We Preached Nonpartisanship

“If you’re not voting, that’s as if you don’t want any voice in your own government.”

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Transcript for We Preached Nonpartisanship

“If you’re not voting, that’s as if you don’t want any voice in your own government.”

Well, I’ve always been interested in politics, and I like to see both sides. I’m not just straight Democrat. I see some good Republicans. I can’t say Trump is anything but a clown. To me, he’s a clown. I see I have agreements there.

I was very active. I was president of the League of Women Voters. And my right hand was a black woman principal of Froebel High School. So, I can show you pictures downstairs; the League of Women Voters was black and white.

The woman that was president of the Hammond League of Women Voters and I met. She – I can’t think of her name anymore – but the Hammond League was active too. So the two of us decided to have a candidates meeting for the candidates to talk, and we wanted both parties. We weren’t going to endorse either one. We packed! They were turned away. There were no seats. It was at Seaman Hall in downtown Gary. It’s recently been torn down.

We used to demonstrate the voting machine. The county used to let us bring the big, the big, old-fashioned voting machine to 5th and Broadway at the bank. And we would have it there for a week. They were more interesting than the ones now. I don’t like the way we vote now.

Her husband worked on the Post Tribune. And she was a – her husband had the local newspaper. And she was from the Gordon family, H. Gordon and Sons, the department store.

Lottie Meyerson, you might of heard of her, she was very active in Gary, too. Biracial. I’m not on that. Yeah, there I am.

We were all active people. Her husband had – that other paper was kind of, well, it was nonpartisan, too. But it was more Republican than Democratic as far as I was concerned. But it didn’t matter, you know, because we preached nonpartisanship.

I think if you’re a citizen at all, you should vote! If you’re not voting, that’s as if that you don’t want any voice in your own government. If you vote, you’ve voiced an opinion.

I have a good friend, and she knows it too. I said, “You have to vote!” And she said, “Well, I’ll think about it.” I said, “There’s no thinking about it. You have to vote. If you vote against me, okay. But vote!” I said, “If you don’t vote, don’t criticize.”

  • It is well documented that neither our state nor our nation was founded on political parties. We say that we treat others as unique individuals but when someone discloses to us their political affiliation, we almost immediately cast identities on that person to ‘fill in the gaps’ for the parts about them we do not know. To me, it does the human condition and complexity of our psychology a great disservice when we categorize people into two ‘silos’ such as Liberal and Conservative, Democrat and Republican. Thank you for this post as conversation is the key to building bridges and breaking down barriers that keep us from achieving a more perfect union.

    • aschuet1

      Thanks for the comment, Robert. I also think this storyteller is notable for how she doesn’t “silo” herself!

      We really do appreciate hearing from folks. Thanks again. Allison